February 26, 2013

carrot-stuffed amaranth and whole-wheat flat-bread

carrot and amaranth flatbread

Last week was a week full of lucky events, one of which involved these beautiful rainbow carrots (and a couple of gorgeous beets) that were absolutely delicious. In my attempts to be adventurous, I tried to plant a few carrot seeds last year, with the hope that I might get some rainbow roots to eat but luck and  the Garden Gods were literally not rooting for me. Thankfully, if I keep seeing these carrots at my local Whole Foods and maybe even the Farmer's Markets this warm season, I won't have to depend on the forces of nature and a very obnoxious family of squirrels that occasionally frequent my garden. 

Carrots and beets

At home, I've been a bit more experimental in the kitchen trying out all sorts of newer varieties of flours that I rarely cook with. A few months ago I tried a very delicious and inspiring amaranth flour based muffin which had such a delicate and tender crumb texture that I instantly fell in love with the taste and knew at some point that it would be worth exploring. Sure enough the combination of amaranth and durum whole-wheat flours made such a very delicate yet tasty flat-bread in this recipe, that I instantly knew it was a treat I'd like to share with you. To make the breads even more wholesome and fun, I combined my freshly grated rainbow carrots with a little a sprinkling of cayenne pepper for heat with the flours. By adding plain non-fat Greek yogurt to bind the dry ingredients, the flat-bread becomes even more tastier and tender. Though, I have mentioned adding a half cup of water to the dough, you may end up using less than this, depending on how  fast your dough comes together. If the dough gets too sticky, you can knead it by hand on a lightly floured clean working surface. Be careful while handling the dough during the rolling-out stage, it is delicate and can tear. However, if it does tear, it's an easy fix, just press the torn edges together with your fingers. You need very little oil to pan-fry the flat-breads and they are best when served freshly hot straight from the pan. I love eating them with a little bit of plain yogurt and a side of a fresh salad or pickle.

Dough and carrots
Dough

carrot-stuffed amaranth and whole-wheat flat-bread

yields: around 15 flat-breads (6 to 7 inch diameter)

ingredients

1 1/2 cups amaranth flour (Bob's Red Mill brand)
1 cup durum whole-wheat flour
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 
1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds
1 cup grated carrots
1/2 cup Greek yogurt, lightly beaten (I used the non-fat variety)
1/2 cup water, at room temperature (*you may end up using less than this)
a little extra whole-wheat flour for rolling out the dough
olive oil for pan-frying the bread

1. In the mixing bowl of a stand mixer, add the flours, salt, cayenne pepper, and caraway seeds. Whisk with a fork to mix the ingredients together.
2. Fold the carrots into the mixture with a silicone spatula until evenly distributed. 
3. Place the bowl in the stand mixer and attach the dough-mixing hook.
4. Set the speed to low-setting (speed settings will vary depending on the brand of the mixer but use the lowest mixing settings recommended for dough preparation). Add the yogurt to the dry ingredients in the bowl and mix till almost combined. Add 2 tablespoons of water at a time to the dough while mixing until the dough comes together. (* You may end up using less than the half cup of water depending on the moisture content of the flour, so add a little at a time).
5. Dust a clean work surface with a little whole-wheat flour and place the dough on it. Knead the dough to form a large ball. Cover the dough with a clean cloth or cling film and let it rest for at least 20 minutes at room temperature.
6. Divide the rested dough into 15 balls of equal size (around 1.5 inches in diameter). Dust a little whole-wheat flour on to a your working surface and carefully roll out each ball into 6 to 7 inch diameter circles with a rolling pin. 
7. Heat a pan/skillet on a medium-high flame. Spread about a 1/2 teaspoon of oil onto the surface of a rolled flat-bread and place the oiled-surface down onto the hot pan. Spread another 1/2 teaspoon of oil onto the upper surface. Cook the flat-bread for around 3 minutes before flipping to cook the other side. The flat-bread is cooked when golden brown and slightly blistered on each side. Serve hot.

12 comments:

  1. Those flatbreads are wonderful! I love experimenting with food.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  2. I love rainbow carrots - so gorgeous! And your flatbread sound just wonderful. Lovely pictures, as always!

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    1. Thanks Amy, I am so glad I came across them this year.

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  3. Love flatbreads! Your flatbread is very unique-looking! I bet it's so delicious. Love the photos of root vegetables.

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  4. I am intrigued by this flour but I haven't ever used it. I wonder if the addition of a little tapioca flour might hold it together better.
    I am sorry about those naughty squirrels.

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    1. You can add a little corn or potato starch but there is really no need to when rolling out the flatbread. Once it is cooked it is fine.
      Amaranth flour is delicate by nature and is pretty versatile. I am loving working with it.

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  5. So sorry about the squirrels, and thank god for WF and farmers market! What a delicious way to incorporate beautiful rainbow carrots. Like you, I am enthusiastic about experimenting with different grains and flour. Have not taken the "amaranth" route just yet, but now I can't wait :D

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    1. Kiran, I think you will love it. I hope you get your hands on some.

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  6. We live right next to the canyon and we get all kinds of wild animals (no, I'm not living in the countryside, but still, we get frequent visits by deer, rabbits, coyotes, crazy right? So I can't really have a garden...unless I make a tall fence! Deer ate all my flowers too. :( It's my dream to have a vegetable garden though... I just don't know how it can be possible. Your flatbread looks healthy and delicious!

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    1. Thanks! I wish I could have a vegetable garden, I am a little excited but also nervous about my fig and pomegranate trees that I planted last year. Hope the squirrels won't bug us this year.

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